USA HAVE TAKEN OVER NORWAY – UKRAINE – THE BALTIC STATES, ALL THE NEW NATO-MEMBERS IN EAST-EUROPE. . NOW THEY HURRY UP FOR SWEEDEN AND FINLAND – WITH THEIR DEADLY EMBRACE

The United States’ Deadly Embrace: Charter of Partnership

CONTENT: The story of John Perkins – and our Supplementary…
US-baltic Charter of Partnership
US-Ukraine Charter on Strategic Partnership

I would like to get help spreading the address of my website, toralvestad.com – especially to the leaders and people of the countries that have received these Charterss with the United States. Ask their leaders to reject them completely, without any vote. If they pass on the knowledge of the governing spirit we have with us in the body, they will be protected by God through the steering spirit when they, in turn, bring it forth.

USA have taken over Norway with the mafia-metode: an offer you can`t refuse

THE SUPPLEMENTARY DEFENSE COOPERATION AGREEMENT BETWEEN NORWAY AND USA is such an offer, especially designed for to take over an allied Nato-member.

Characteristic of such a well known mafia offer, is that the content and conditions are so unreasonable that everyone should understand that it is a commandment of submission. The fear of being assassinated, which has been the fate of so many other heads of state, breaks down all will of resistance. Negotiations that have taken place have only cosmetic value. The fear that is created spreads to newspapers and other media and eventually to the whole people. Everyone becomes puppets who, without hesitation, just do what they are instructed to do.

The former Erna Solberg government stated in the hearing document:”the agreement is an initiative from USA.”
So, Norway has not asked for it, and the majority of the population definitely don`t want it.

She also wrote that Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Hungary, Bulgaria and Romania have got similar Supplementary Defense Agreement as Norway. It means there is no dought that they, at last, have been forced to ask for, and accept a Nato membership. And thus speak as Joe Biden expected them to do. Then, when our own Jens Stoltenberg and Biden are telling that these countries volontarily chose to ask for Nato-membership, they tell lies.

John Perkins

It was unknown to me that the United States for a long time had gained control of many small, but resourceful developing countries in the world, using this mafia method, until I had watched the program about the American, John Perkins. «An American agent asks for forgiveness», which NRK-TV gave us 31.01. 2009 in prime time. Now we are in need of the story one more time.

But the preview is still on the internet:
“(Apology of an Economic Hit man) John Perkins was part of a secret group (National Security Agency) which, on behalf of the US government, carried out the dirtiest jobs in South and Central America. Military coups, staged elections, political assassinations and falsified reports were part of the reality. In front of an angry crowd in Quito, Ecuador, he asks of forgiveness and apologizes what he has been involved in. But the hall is stormed by a crowd that wants clear answers as to why they have had to suffer for so long. The film provides an interesting and frightening picture of the mechanisms that have helped to govern our modern world.

Last year in June, I played the film on YouTube with English text on the screen, wrote down the most important part, put it into Norwegian and sent it to many Norwegian newspapers to show the Norwegian people that the “SDCA” is a mafia deal. But the newspapers refused to take it.
So when the deal was signed, most of the population hadn’t even heard about this “Agreement”. And I had to use my own website to make it known.

YouTube: From a Jordan Harbinger show
John Perkins — Confession of an economic hitman:

First of all, my title was chef economist; I was very legitimate, I didn’t go out as a spy or something, I went out as a representative of the World bank or the Asian Development Bank, or for the US Agency for International Development or the State Department. But my job, and that of my staff, was to identify countries that had resources our corporations want, like oil. And then we went into that country and arrange for huge loan to that country from The World Bank or its sister organizations. But the money never actually went to the country. Instead it went to our own corporations — the big engineering companies; the Bechtels, the Haliburtons, the Brown and Roots, or the General Electrics that made the equipment to build huge infrastructure projects in those countries. Electric power systems, industrial parks, highways, ports things that made huge profits for the companies that built them; obvious our companies, but also made money for the few wealthy families in those countries; the people who owned the industries, the banks, the shopping malls, but they’d left the rest of the country in dire debt, and so the majority of the people suffered because the money was diverted from health, education and other social services to pay the interest on the loans.

And in the end the country couldn’t pay back the principal on the loan. So we, economic hitmen will go back in under the guise of the International Monetary Fund, the IMF, and we’d say: Hey, well structure that loan for you, but there’s conditions that you’ve got to meet. In those conditions were things like, you know, privatize your public sector, businesses, your utility companies, your schools, your prisons and sell them our investors, that at cut rate prices — first of all allow our companies to take your resources; oil or whatever it is — real cheap — without any environmental or social regulations. And privatize. And vote with us on the next UN vote. And let us build a military base on your soil. And so, this was the game we were playing.

And that was a game that in the beginning I thought was doing a big service to these countries… (discussion with Jordan Hardinger on economics and that these things are done by design…

John Perkins: Well, it’s by design because there’s a long history here of what we could call colonialism — so how do you take over countries – you threaten to send your military and threaten to overthrow presidents or assassinate them, which is something we have done, you know US has a history that we’ve admitted to. So these presidents of countries; when I would go in and say hey; put your country deep into debt, you know with this loan from the world bank , you and your people are going to make a lot of money out of it. But the majority of the people aren’t going to do so well. The leaders know this, but the other side of that formula is that these people know that if they don`t take these billions of dollars I’m offering them, then the guys with the gun are going to walk in. I didn`t carry a gun, but I knew that right behind me there were people we called jackals, who are CIA operatives, normally assets not, often not-employees, but contractors who either overthrow governments or assassinate the leaders. This isn`t a conspiracy theory, it’s a fact. Henry Kissinger — the united states — we’ve admitted that we did this sort of thing with Salvador Allende in Chile, and (Arbans?) and Guatemala and most of the deck. And Iran, and Lumumba, and Congo and ZM and Vietnam and on and on and on.
So the leaders of these countries were put in a very difficult position here; Put your country deep into debt, and you and your family will get wealthy and be able to go to college in the United Stater and so on and so forth — or, we`ll take you out of office, and the next guy will buy into the deal.

Jordan Harbinger: Right, like eventually we’ll kill enough people that somebody will have sense enough to listen. So it’s like a mafia business model to a banking business model which. …I don`t see a ton of difference… you’re making them an offer that they can’t refuse. And they just don`t get The Horse Head in the bed, as a warning? John Perkins: Yea, well The Horse Head is there, yes, it’s a little more subtle — they know what happened to Allende and Chile, they know what happened to most of the deck, they’re all very aware of that. So that knowledge itself is «The Horse Head. And if they’re» not getting it, we`ll give them subtle reminders of what’s happened to others. ….

Later in the film he tells that the two elected presidents in Panama and Ecuador were the only ones who turned down the offer. Within three months, each of them died when their small plane crashed in the sea, blown by a bomb. No evidence was found.

According to John Perkins‘ latest book, “New Confessions” and lectures posted on YouTube, things have now gotten much worse. Because during the twelve years that have passed since the first book, he says that the United States has used this mafia method in Europe as well.

Have the United States changing governments become so familiar with getting away with this behavior without legal prosecution from either its own national law or international law, that they just continue to let «The Horsehead” work for them?

They also said; “The United States has negotiated similar agreements with several European countries, including Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Hungary, Bulgaria and Romania”

One may ask if they too have felt death threatened to sign the agreement.

Myriad
The “Supplementary Agreement” has nothing to do with our NATO membership. But in the the heading text on the website of the US Defense Department, you my be led to believe that there is a connection.

quotation:
“The United States and Norway are founding members of NATO and have enjoyed more than seventy years of close and strategic defense relations both bilaterally and through NATO. Recently, this cooperation has included rotations of U.S. Marines to Norway for cold-weather training and a myriad (my emphasize) of other bilateral and Allied joint training activities involving the U.S. Armed Forces.”

It is not true.The military cooperation through 70 years has been forced on Norway. From my point of wiew, there have never been a military friendship with the majority of the population in Norway. Just a continous violation of the United Nations charter,
point 5: No one – neither the UN nor the UN member states – are allowed to interfere in other countries’ internal affairs.

In 2015, the researchers, Kjetil Skogrand og Rolf Tamnes, by the Institutt for forsvarsstudier, had wrote a book on the Cold War, «Fryktens likevekt»: If Sovjet troops invaded North-Norway through Finnmark, USA would drop nuclear bombs to stop them.

Tromsø was said to be the target by one of the simulated nuclear bomb attacks that were done! What a defense and what a help!

Here you may read and judge for yourself the Agreement – the myriad. Is this normal? Or a mafia- deal;”an offer you can not refuse,” special designed for taking over Norway?:

SUPPLEMENTARY DEFENSE COOPERATION AGREEMENT BETWEEN
THE GOVERNMENT OF
THE KINGDOM OF NORWAY
AND
THE GOVERNMENT OF
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI. XVII. XVIII. XIX.
XX.
XXI. XXII. XXIII. XXIV. XXV . XXVI. XXVII. XXVIII. XXIX. XXX. ANNEX A
CONTENTS
Preamble
Scope and Purpose
Definitions
Access to and Use of Agreed Facilities and Areas Prepositioning of Defense Equipment, Supplies, and Materiel Property Ownership
Security
Entry and Exit
Logistics Support
Motor Vehicles
Licenses
Movement of Aircraft, Vessels, and Vehicles
Criminal Jurisdiction
Custody and Access
Discipline
Claims
Official Tax Exemptions
Personal Tax Exemptions
Official Importation and Exportation
Personal Importation and Exportation
Customs Procedures
Military Service Activities
Military Post Offices
Currency and Exchange
Labor
Contracting Procedures
U.S. Contractors
Environment, Public Health, and Safety
Utilities and Communications
Implementation and Disputes
Entry Into Force, Amendment, and Duration
Agreed Facilities and Areas
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The Government of the Kingdom of Norway (“Norway”) and the Government of the United States of America (the “United States”), hereinafter referred to collectively as “the Parties” and individually as a “Party”,

Cognizant of the rights and obligations deriving from the North Atlantic Treaty, signed at Washington on April 4, 1949, which entered into force August 24, 1949;

Considering that United States (“U.S.”) forces, their dependents, and U.S. contractors may be present in the territory of Norway and that the purpose of such presence of U.S. forces is to further the efforts of the Parties to promote peace and security in the areas of mutual interest and benefit and to take part in common defense efforts;

Acknowledging that the presence of U.S. forces contributes to strengthening the security and stability of Norway and the region;

Desiring to share in the responsibility of supporting those U.S. forces that may be present in the territory of Norway in an equitable and sustainable manner;

Recognizing the Mutual Defense Assistance Agreement Between Norway and the United States of America, with annexes, signed at Washington January 27, 1950 (the “1950 Agreement”), which entered into force February 24, 1950, and recalling the more than seventy years of defense cooperation thereunder;

Recognizing the Agreement Between the Government of Norway and the Government of the United States of America Concerning Relief From Taxation of the United States Government

Expenditures in Norway for the Common Defense, effected by exchange of notes at Oslo June 27, 1952 (the “1952 Agreement”), which entered into force June 27, 1952, with related exchange of notes at Oslo June 27, 1952;

Recognizing the Agreement Between the Parties to the North Atlantic Treaty Regarding the Status of Their Forces, signed at London June 19, 1951 (the “NATO SOFA”), which entered into force August 23, 1953, including its provision regarding separate arrangements supplementary to the NATO SOFA;

Recognizing the Acquisition and Cross Servicing Agreement Between the Government of the Kingdom of Norway Represented by the Ministry of Defense and the Government of the United States of America Represented by the Department of Defense, with annexes, signed at Oslo and Stuttgart July 8 and August 5, 2009 (the “ACSA”), which entered into force August 5, 2009;

Recognizing the Agreement Between the Government of Norway and the Government of the United States of America Relating to the Safeguarding of Classified Information, with annex,
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effected by exchange of notes at Oslo February 26, 1970, which entered into force February 26, 1970, as amended by exchange of notes at Oslo September 27, 1984;

Recognizing the need to enhance their common security, to contribute to international peace and stability, and to deepen cooperation in the areas of defense and security; and
Desiring to conclude an agreement on the enhanced cooperation between the United States and Norway;
Have agreed as follows:
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ARTICLE I SCOPE AND PURPOSE
1. This Agreement sets forth the framework for enhanced partnership and defense and security cooperation between the United States and Norway, builds upon more than seventy years of defense cooperation exemplified by the 1950 Agreement, and supplements the terms and conditions set forth in the NATO SOFA that govern the presence of U.S. forces and their dependents in the territory of Norway and, in specific situations indicated herein, the presence and activities of U.S. contractors in the territory of Norway.

2. All activities under this Agreement shall be conducted with full respect for the sovereignty, laws, and international legal obligations of Norway, including with regard to the stockpiling of certain types of weapons on Norwegian territory. Nothing in this Agreement alters Norwegian policies with regard to the stationing of foreign forces on Norwegian territory, and the stockpiling or deployment of nuclear weapons on Norwegian territory.
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ARTICLE II DEFINITIONS
For purposes of this Agreement, the following terms are hereunder defined:

1. “U.S. forces” means the entity comprising the force and the civilian component, and all property, equipment, and materiel (including vehicles, vessels, and aircraft operated by or for the United States) of the U.S. Armed Forces present in the territory of Norway.

2. “Force” has the meaning set forth in Article I, Paragraph 1(a), of the NATO SOFA.

3. Except as otherwise provided in Article XV of this Agreement, “civilian component” has the meaning set forth in Article I, Paragraph 1(b), of the NATO SOFA, and also includes: a) employees of non-Norwegian, non-commercial organizations who are nationals of the United States or ordinarily resident in the territory of the United States and who are not ordinarily resident in the territory of Norway, and who, solely for the purpose of contributing to the welfare, morale, or education of U.S. forces, are accompanying those forces in the territory of Norway; and b) dependents employed by U.S. forces, including for the purposes of the military service activities contemplated in Articles XXI and XXII of this Agreement, and by the non- commercial organizations referred to in this Paragraph.

4. “U.S. contractors” means legal entities that are not incorporated nor ordinarily domiciled in the territory of Norway under Norwegian law, including their employees who are not nationals of Norway nor ordinarily resident in the territory of Norway, and individuals who are not nationals of Norway nor ordinarily resident in the territory of Norway, when those entities or individuals are present in the territory of Norway under a contract or subcontract with the U.S. Department of Defense to supply goods and services in connection with activities under this Agreement.

5. “Norwegian contractors” means legal entities that are incorporated or ordinarily domiciled in the territory of Norway under Norwegian law, including their employees, employees of U.S. contractors who are nationals of Norway or ordinarily resident in the territory of Norway, and individuals who are nationals of Norway or ordinarily resident in the territory of Norway, when those entities or individuals are present in the territory of Norway under a contract or subcontract with the U.S. Department of Defense to supply goods and services in connection with activities under this Agreement.

6. “Dependent” has the meaning set forth in Article I, Paragraph 1(c), of the NATO SOFA, and also includes a family member of a member of the force or the civilian component who (a) is financially, legally, or for reasons of health dependent upon and supported by such member; (b) shares the quarters occupied by such member; and (c) is present in the territory of Norway with the consent of U.S. forces authorities.

7. “Agreed Facilities and Areas” means the facilities and areas in the territory of Norway listed in Annex A to this Agreement that are used with the consent of Norway by U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, Norwegian contractors, dependents, and others as mutually agreed.
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8. “Executive Agent” means the U.S. Department of Defense for the United States and the Royal Ministry of Defence of the Kingdom of Norway for Norway, or their respective designees.
9. “Official U.S. Information” means information that is owned by, produced for or by, or is subject to the control of the United States.
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ARTICLE III
ACCESS TO AND USE OF AGREED FACILITIES AND AREAS
1. With full respect for the sovereignty, laws, and international legal obligations of Norway, including with regard to the stockpiling of certain types of weapons on Norwegian territory, and with consultation and consideration of the views of both Parties, U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, Norwegian contractors, dependents, and others as mutually agreed are authorized unimpeded access to and use of Agreed

Facilities and Areas for visits; training; exercises; maneuvers; transit; support and related activities; refueling of aircraft; bunkering of vessels; landing and recovery of aircraft; temporary maintenance of vehicles, vessels, and aircraft; accommodation of personnel; communications; staging and deploying of forces and materiel; pre-positioning of equipment, supplies, and materiel; security assistance and cooperation activities; joint and combined training activities; humanitarian and disaster relief activities; contingency operations; construction in support of mutually agreed activities; and such other purposes as the Parties or their Executive Agents may agree, including those undertaken in the framework of the North Atlantic Treaty. The Parties shall have joint access to and use of Agreed Facilities and Areas, except for any portions thereof specifically designated by the Parties or their Executive Agents for the exclusive access and use of U.S. forces.

2. In furtherance of such activities and purposes, Norway authorizes U.S. forces to control entry to Agreed Facilities and Areas, or portions thereof, that have been provided for exclusive use by U.S. forces, and to coordinate entry with Norwegian authorities at Agreed Facilities and Areas jointly used by U.S. forces and Norwegian Armed Forces, for purposes of safety and security. The Parties intend that the Executive Agents will establish procedures, including through implementing arrangements as appropriate, to cooperate regarding operational and security concerns for access to Agreed Facilities and Areas.

3. When requested, the Norwegian Executive Agent shall make reasonable efforts to facilitate temporary access and use by U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and Norwegian contractors to public land and facilities (including roads, ports, and airfields) that are not a part of an Agreed Facility and Area, including those owned or controlled by Norway or by local authorities, and to private land and facilities (including roads, ports, and airfields) for use in support of U.S. forces. Such facilitation shall be without cost to U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, or Norwegian contractors.

4. In making Agreed Facilities and Areas available and in the use of such Agreed Facilities and Areas, the Parties shall give due regard to operational and security concerns. The Parties intend that the Executive Agents will establish procedures, including through implementing arrangements as appropriate, to cooperate regarding operational and security concerns at Agreed Facilities and Areas.

5. Norway shall furnish, without rental or similar costs to U.S. forces, all Agreed Facilities and Areas, including those jointly used by U.S. forces and Norwegian Armed Forces.

6. U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and Norwegian contractors may undertake construction activities on, and make alterations and improvements to, Agreed Facilities and Areas in furtherance of the activities and purposes set forth in Article III, Paragraph 1, of this Agreement.
8

U.S. forces shall consult with the Norwegian Executive Agent on issues regarding such construction, alterations, and improvements, including in regards to obtaining the authorizations and permits as described in Paragraph 7 of this Article, based on the Parties’ shared intent that the technical requirements and construction standards of any such projects undertaken by or on behalf of U.S. forces should be consistent with the requirements and standards of both Parties. Towards this end, the Parties intend that the Executive Agents will implement this Paragraph in accordance with mutually determined procedures, including through implementing arrangements as appropriate. U.S. forces may carry out such construction, alterations, and improvements with members of the force.

7. The Norwegian Executive Agent shall facilitate the efforts of U.S. forces in these undertakings by obtaining the necessary Norwegian authorizations and permits for such construction, alterations, and improvements, performed by or on behalf of U.S. forces. Such authorizations and permits shall be issued without cost to U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, or Norwegian contractors.

8. U.S. forces shall be responsible for the construction and development costs for Agreed Facilities and Areas provided for the exclusive use of U.S. forces, and for the operations and maintenance costs thereof, unless otherwise provided for in a previous or subsequent arrangement or agreement between the Parties.

9. The Parties shall be responsible on the basis of proportionate use for the construction and development costs and operations and maintenance costs of Agreed Facilities and Areas provided for joint use, or otherwise used jointly by U.S. forces and Norwegian Armed Forces, unless otherwise provided for in a previous or subsequent arrangement or agreement between the Parties.

10. Funding of construction projects undertaken by U.S. forces shall be in accordance with U.S. laws and regulations.

11. The Parties shall cooperate on planning regarding the use and development at, around, and adjacent to Agreed Facilities and Areas to ensure the implementation of this Agreement over the long term.

12. Nothing in this Article alters Norwegian policies with regard to the stationing of foreign forces on Norwegian territory, and the stockpiling or deployment of nuclear weapons on Norwegian territory.
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ARTICLE IV PREPOSITIONING OF DEFENSE EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES, AND MATERIEL
1. With full respect for the sovereignty, laws, and international legal obligations of Norway, including with regard to the stockpiling of certain types of weapons on Norwegian territory, and with consultation and consideration of the views of both Parties, U.S. forces may transport, preposition, and store defense equipment, supplies, and materiel (“prepositioned materiel”) at Agreed Facilities and Areas, and at other locations as mutually agreed. U.S. forces shall notify, in advance, the Norwegian Armed Forces regarding the types, quantities, and delivery schedules of such prepositioned materiel that U.S. forces intend to transport or preposition in the territory of Norway, as well as regarding U.S. contractors and Norwegian contractors who make such deliveries.

2. The prepositioned materiel of U.S. forces and the facilities or portions thereof designated for storage of such prepositioned materiel shall be for the exclusive use of U.S. forces. U.S. forces shall have exclusive control over the access to, use of, and disposition of such prepositioned materiel and shall have the unencumbered right to remove such prepositioned materiel at any time from the territory of Norway.

3. U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and Norwegian contractors shall have unimpeded access to and use of storage facilities for all matters related to the prepositioning and storage of prepositioned materiel, including delivery, management, inspection, use, maintenance, and removal of such prepositioned materiel, regardless of whether these storage facilities are Agreed Facilities and Areas. Aircraft, vehicles, and vessels operated by or for U.S. forces shall have access to aerial ports and seaports of Norway and other locations, as agreed, for the delivery to, storage and maintenance in, and removal from the territory of Norway of U.S. forces’ prepositioned materiel.

4. The Parties shall consult as necessary on activities pursuant to this Article.

5. Nothing in this Article alters Norwegian policies with regard to the stationing of foreign forces on Norwegian territory, and the stockpiling or deployment of nuclear weapons on Norwegian territory.

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ARTICLE V PROPERTY OWNERSHIP
1. All buildings, non-relocatable structures, and assemblies affixed to the land in Agreed Facilities and Areas, including those altered or improved by U.S. forces, shall remain the property of Norway. All such buildings, structures, and assemblies constructed by U.S. forces shall become the property of Norway, once constructed, but shall be used by U.S. forces until no longer needed by U.S. forces.

2. U.S. forces shall return as the sole and unencumbered property of Norway any Agreed Facility or Area, or any portion thereof, including buildings, non-relocatable structures, and assemblies constructed by U.S. forces once no longer used by U.S. forces, provided that the United States shall incur no expense to do so. The Parties or their Executive Agents shall consult regarding the terms of return of any Agreed Facility or Area, including potential compensation for the mutually determined residual value, if any, of improvements or construction made by the United States.

3. U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and Norwegian contractors shall retain title to all goods, equipment, materiel, supplies, relocatable structures, and other movable property they have imported into or acquired within the territory of Norway in connection with this Agreement unless and until such time as they surrender title.

4. The Parties or their Executive Agents may consult regarding the possible transfer or purchase of U.S. forces’ equipment determined to be excess to the needs of the United States, as may be authorized by U.S. laws and regulations.
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ARTICLE VI SECURITY
1. Norway shall take such measures as are necessary to ensure the protection, safety, and security of U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, Norwegian contractors, dependents, and prepositioned materiel, and the protection and security of Official U.S. Information. In furtherance of this responsibility, Norwegian and U.S. forces authorities shall cooperate closely to ensure that security and protection is provided.

2. The U.S. forces shall coordinate security plans with Norwegian authorities.

3. Consistent with Article VII, Paragraph 10 of the NATO SOFA and subject to Paragraph 4 of this Article for civilian-operated portions of Agreed Facilities and Areas, U.S. forces are authorized to exercise the rights and authorities necessary within Agreed Facilities and Areas for U.S. forces’ use, operation, defense, or control of Agreed Facilities and Areas by taking appropriate and proportionate measures, including such measures necessary to maintain or restore order and to protect U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, Norwegian contractors, and dependents.

4. Within the immediate vicinity of Agreed Facilities and Areas and within civilian-operated portions of Agreed Facilities and Areas, Norwegian authorities shall take necessary measures to ensure U.S. forces’ use, operation, defense, and control of Agreed Facilities and Areas. In extraordinary circumstances, and in accordance with mutually approved security plans, U.S. forces may take necessary and proportionate measures to maintain or restore the security, defense, and continuity of operations of U.S. forces.
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ARTICLE VII ENTRY AND EXIT
1. Norway shall not require countersignature of movement orders under Article III, Paragraph 2(b), of the NATO SOFA.

2. In accordance with the NATO SOFA, Norway shall not require passports or visas for entry into and departures from the territory of Norway for members of the force holding the required personal identity card and a valid movement order. Further, Norway shall not require visas for entry into and departure from the territory of Norway for members of the civilian component, dependents, and U.S. contractors holding a valid passport and a U.S. Department of Defense identification card, an official movement order, or letter of authorization issued by the competent authority of the United States. Norwegian authorities shall make any annotations required by Norwegian law in the passports of members of the civilian component, U.S. contractors, and dependents.

3. U.S. forces, dependents, and U.S. contractors shall be exempt from regulations governing the registration and control of aliens.

4. Should a member of the U.S. forces die or leave the territory of Norway on transfer, the dependents of such member shall continue to be accorded the status of dependents under this Agreement for a period of ninety (90) days after such death or transfer. In cases where dependent children are enrolled in education facilities in the territory of Norway prior to the member’s death or transfer, the dependents shall continue to be accorded the status of dependents for a period of not less than thirty (30) calendar days after the end of the school year or termination of enrollment.
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ARTICLE VIII LOGISTICS SUPPORT
1. Norway shall use best efforts, considering its internal national requirements and available capabilities, to provide to U.S. forces, upon request, logistics support to conduct activities under this Agreement.

2. As appropriate, such logistics support shall be provided, and reimbursement made, in accordance with existing agreements or arrangements, including the ACSA, unless otherwise mutually determined.

3. For any logistics support not addressed by Paragraph 2 of this Article, U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and Norwegian contractors shall pay reasonable costs for logistics support requested and received in connection with activities under this Agreement. In this regard, Norway shall accord to U.S. forces treatment no less favorable than is accorded to the Norwegian Armed Forces, including charging U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and Norwegian contractors rates no less favorable than those paid by the Norwegian Armed Forces for similar logistics support, less taxes, fees, and similar charges.
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ARTICLE IX MOTOR VEHICLES
l. Norwegian authorities shall honor the registration and licensing by U.S. military and civilian authorities of motor vehicles and trailers of U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and dependents. Upon the request of U.S. forces authorities, Norwegian authorities shall issue without charge license plates for U.S. forces’ official, non-tactical vehicles in accordance with procedures established for the Norwegian Armed Forces, and license plates that are indistinguishable from those issued to the Norwegian population at large for private motor vehicles of the members of the U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and dependents. This Paragraph shall be implemented in accordance with mutually determined procedures.

2. U.S. forces authorities shall take adequate safety measures with regard to motor vehicles and trailers registered and licensed by them or used by U.S. forces in the territory of Norway.
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ARTICLE X LICENSES
1. A license or other permit issued by U.S. authorities to a member of the U.S. forces or a U.S. contractor, empowering the holder to operate vehicles, vessels, or aircraft of the force shall be valid for such operation within the territory of Norway.

2. Norwegian authorities shall accept as valid, without a driving test or fee, driving licenses issued by the United States, its States, or political subdivisions for the operation of private motor vehicles by members of the U.S. forces and their dependents, and U.S. contractors. International drivers’ licenses shall not be required.

3. Norway shall not require members of the U.S. forces or U.S. contractors to obtain professional licenses issued by Norway in relation to the provision of services in connection with this Agreement to U.S. forces, dependents, U.S. contractors, and other persons as mutually agreed provided they hold a valid U.S. professional license, professional license from a Member State of the European Economic Area, or other adequate professional qualifications accepted by U.S. authorities.
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ARTICLE XI
MOVEMENT OF AIRCRAFT, VESSELS, AND VEHICLES
1. In accordance with applicable clearances issued by Norwegian authorities in response to requests made pursuant to mutually determined procedures, aircraft, vessels, and vehicles operated by or exclusively for U.S. forces may enter, exit, move freely, and conduct specified activities, including but not limited to aerial refueling, within the territory of Norway. Such aircraft, vessels, and vehicles shall respect the relevant rules of air, maritime, and land safety and movement.

2. Clearances granted for multiple unspecified entries, exits, and movements within the territory of Norway shall be limited to a maximum of one year and shall not include Svalbard, Jan Mayen, and Bouvetøya.

3. Aircraft, vessels, and vehicles operated by or exclusively for U.S. forces shall be free from boarding and inspection without the consent of the United States.
4. Aircraft operated by or exclusively for U.S. forces shall not be subject to air navigation fees, dues, or other charges, such as overflight, en route, or terminal navigation fees, and shall not be subject to landing or parking fees at government-owned and operated airfields in the territory of Norway.

5. Vessels operated by or exclusively for U.S. forces shall not be subject to payment of pilotage or port fees, lighterage charges, harbor dues, or similar charges at government-owned and operated ports in the territory of Norway.

6. U.S. forces, and U.S. contractors and Norwegian contractors that are operating on behalf of U.S. forces, shall pay reasonable charges for services requested and received, at rates no less favorable than those paid by the Norwegian Armed Forces, less taxes, fees, and similar charges.
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ARTICLE XII CRIMINAL JURISDICTION
1. For purposes of determining whether an alleged criminal offense has arisen out of any act or omission done in the performance of official duty by a member of the U.S. forces under Article VII, Paragraph 3(a)(ii), of the NATO SOFA, determination by the appropriate U.S. forces authority in the territory of Norway that such act or omission was done in the performance of official duty shall constitute conclusive proof of the fact. Norwegian authorities may present any information bearing on the official duty determination and U.S. authorities shall take full account of such information and the Parties shall consult as soon as practicable. In those instances where Norwegian authorities believe the circumstances require review of the duty determination, Norwegian authorities retain the option of requesting confirmation from higher U.S. authorities.

2. Norway waives its primary right to exercise criminal jurisdiction over members of the U.S. forces as provided by Article VII, Paragraph 3(c), of the NATO SOFA. In specific cases that Norwegian authorities determine involve special circumstances, Norwegian authorities may withdraw the waiver by providing a statement in writing to the competent U.S. forces authorities not later than thirty (30) days after receipt of the notification described in Paragraph 3 of this Article.

3. Subject to any particular arrangements that may be made for minor offenses, U.S. forces authorities shall notify Norwegian authorities as soon as practicable of each case falling under the provisions of Paragraph 2 of this Article.
4. Whenever a member of the U.S. forces, or a dependent, is prosecuted by Norwegian authorities, jurisdiction shall be exercised by Norwegian civilian courts of ordinary jurisdiction.

5. Members of the U.S. forces and dependents shall not be tried in absentia without their consent.

6. Recognizing that Norway has the right to take appropriate investigatory measures regarding alleged offenses, the competent authorities of the Parties shall cooperate in the carrying out of all necessary investigations into alleged offenses, as referred to in Article VII, Paragraph 6(a) of the NATO SOFA.
18

ARTICLE XIII CUSTODY AND ACCESS
1. Norwegian authorities shall notify U.S. forces authorities immediately when a member of the U.S. forces, or a dependent, is arrested or detained by Norwegian authorities. U.S. forces authorities shall have prompt access, in coordination with Norwegian authorities, to any such individual whenever requested. U.S. forces shall be permitted to be present during all proceedings, including interrogations of such member or dependent by Norwegian authorities.

2. A member of the U.S. forces or a dependent under investigation or pending trial by Norwegian authorities shall remain under the control of, or be handed over to, U.S. forces authorities, if such authorities so request, until the conclusion of all related judicial proceedings, including appellate proceedings. In such cases, U.S. forces authorities shall ensure the appearance at such proceedings of the member of the force. U.S. forces authorities shall only request that a member of the civilian component or a dependent remain under the control of or be handed over to U.S. forces authorities if such authorities are able to ensure the appearance of such persons at such proceedings. In cases that Norwegian authorities determine involve special circumstances pursuant to Article XII of this Agreement, U.S. forces authorities shall give sympathetic consideration to a request by Norwegian authorities for control of a member of the U.S. forces or a dependent until the conclusion of all judicial proceedings. In the event Norwegian judicial proceedings are not completed within one (1) year of their commencement, U.S. forces authorities shall be relieved of any obligations under this Paragraph. This period of time may be extended by six (6) months as agreed to by U.S. forces authorities and Norwegian authorities. Such an extension shall be agreed to unless this jeopardizes the defendant’s right to a speedy trial. Any further extensions shall be by mutual agreement.

3. Any period of time spent in restraint exercised by Norwegian authorities or U.S. forces authorities shall be credited against any sentence to confinement eventually adjudged in the same case.

4. Except as otherwise agreed by the Parties, confinement imposed by a Norwegian court upon a member of the U.S. forces, or a dependent, shall be served in one or more Norwegian penal institutions designated for such purposes by the Parties. Norwegian authorities shall permit U.S. forces authorities to visit such persons outside of regular visiting hours and to provide such persons with assistance, including for their health, welfare, and morale, such as clothing, food, bedding, medical and dental care, and religious counseling upon coordination with the appropriate Norwegian officials. Norwegian authorities shall permit family members to visit such persons in accordance with regular visiting hours and as also may be agreed by special arrangement, and to provide such persons with appropriate assistance, including for their health, welfare, and morale upon coordination with the appropriate Norwegian officials.
19

ARTICLE XIV DISCIPLINE
1. U.S. forces authorities shall be responsible for the maintenance of discipline over U.S. forces and, for this purpose, may police the Agreed Facilities and Areas or other camps, establishments, or premises where they may be located as the result of this Agreement or any other agreement or arrangement.

2. Where the Agreed Facilities and Areas or other camps, establishments, or premises, or parts thereof, are jointly used with the Norwegian Armed Forces, the appropriate authorities of the Parties shall establish coordination procedures concerning the policing of such jointly used locations.

3. Recognizing that Norway has sovereign law enforcement authorities within the territory of Norway, U.S. forces authorities may authorize the use of military police units for the maintenance of discipline over U.S. forces in communities near military facilities and areas where U.S. forces are located, in accordance with mutually determined procedures and in coordination with Norwegian officials.
20

ARTICLE XV CLAIMS
1. Members of the U.S. forces, including the civilian component, shall not be subject to any proceedings for civil claims or administrative penalties arising out of acts or omissions attributable to such persons done in the performance of their official duties. Such claims may be presented to Norwegian authorities and processed according to the provisions contained in Article VIII of the NATO SOFA.

2. For purposes of this Article, the term “civilian component” shall include all persons, regardless of their nationality or place of residence, who are U.S. Government employees acting in the performance of official duty as assigned by U.S. forces, but shall not include U.S. contractors, Norwegian contractors, or employees of those contractors, or non-commercial organizations, regardless of their nationality or place of residence.

3. For purposes of determining whether potential civil liability has arisen out of any act or omission done in the performance of official duty by a member of the U.S. forces, including the civilian component, certification by the appropriate U.S. forces authority in the territory of Norway that such act or omission was done in the performance of official duty shall constitute conclusive proof of the fact. Norwegian authorities retain the option of requesting confirmation from the next higher U.S. military echelon.

4. Members of the U.S. forces, including the civilian component, shall not suffer default judgments or actions prejudicial to their interests when official duties or duly authorized absences temporarily prevent their attendance at non-criminal proceedings. If this provision results in an undue delay to non-criminal proceedings, U.S. forces authorities shall promptly inform Norwegian authorities, upon their request, of the expected date of return of the individual.
21

ARTICLE XVI OFFICIAL TAX EXEMPTIONS
1. Confirming the spirit of the 1950 Agreement and consistent with the 1952 Agreement, along with specific exemptions found therein, with regard to value added taxes (“VAT”), sales taxes, use taxes, excise taxes, and similar or successor taxes, an exemption shall apply to acquisitions by or for U.S. forces of goods, materiel, supplies, services, equipment, and other property (a) acquired for the ultimate use by U.S. forces; (b) to be consumed in the performance of a contract with or on behalf of U.S. forces; or (c) to be incorporated into articles or facilities used by U.S. forces. U.S. forces shall provide to Norwegian authorities an appropriate certification that such goods, materiel, supplies, services, equipment, and other property are for U.S. forces.

2. An exemption shall be applied to acquisitions referred to in Paragraph 1 in accordance with mutually determined procedures. Such an exemption shall be applied at the point of purchase, if the transaction is accompanied by the appropriate certification referred to in Paragraph 1 above. For all other purchases, or in the event a vendor is unable to provide such point of purchase exemption, the exemption shall be granted by reimbursement within thirty (30) days of receipt of a request.
22

ARTICLE XVII PERSONAL TAX EXEMPTIONS
1. Confirming the spirit of the 1950 and 1952 Agreements, members of the U.S. forces and dependents shall not be liable to pay any tax, fee, license charge, or similar charges, including VAT, in the territory of Norway on the purchase, ownership, possession, use, transfer between themselves, or transfer in connection with death of their tangible movable property imported into the territory of Norway or acquired there for their own personal use. An exemption shall be applied in accordance with procedures mutually determined. Members of the U.S. forces and dependents who possess or use sound and television broadcast receiving apparatus and Internet- capable devices in the territory of Norway shall be exempt from taxes, fees, license charges, or similar charges related to such use or possession. Motor vehicles owned by members of the U.S. forces and dependents shall be exempt from Norwegian road taxes, registration or license fees, and similar charges, but not from the payment of tolls for the use of roads, bridges, and tunnels paid by members of the general public.

2. The exemption from taxes on income provided by Article X of the NATO SOFA shall also apply to:
a) income received by members of the U.S. forces, dependents, and employees of U.S. contractors who are not nationals of Norway nor ordinarily resident in the territory of Norway from employment with the organizations referred to in Article II, Paragraph 3, of this Agreement; and activities addressed in Articles XXI and XXII of this Agreement;
b) income received by members of the U.S. forces and dependents from any individual, corporation, or entity other than Norwegian individuals, corporations, or entities residing within the territory of Norway for tax purposes; and
c) salaries, wages, and other similar remuneration received by employees of U.S. contractors who are present in the territory of Norway solely to perform a contract or subcontract for U.S. forces from employment under such contract or subcontract, as well as income received by such employees of U.S. contractors from any individual, corporation, or entity other than Norwegian individuals, corporations, or entities residing within the territory of Norway for tax purposes. The Parties intend to consult as necessary to effect the shared goal of preventing abuse by U.S. contractors of the rights granted under this provision.

3. The provisions of Norwegian laws and regulations pertaining to the obligation of an employer or self-employed individual to withhold or prepay income taxes and social security contributions shall not be applicable to income exempt from taxation in the territory of Norway.
23

ARTICLE XVIII
OFFICIAL IMPORTATION AND EXPORTATION
1. Confirming the spirit of the 1950 and 1952 Agreements, along with the specific exemptions found therein, and with reference to Article XI of the NATO SOFA, goods, materiel, supplies, equipment, and other property (a) imported by U.S. forces; (b) which are for the ultimate use by or for U.S. forces, including to support military service activities provided for in Articles XXI and XXII of this Agreement; (c) which are to be used or consumed in the performance of a contract with or on behalf of U.S. forces; or (d) which are to be incorporated into articles or facilities used by U.S. forces, shall be permitted entry into the territory of Norway free from duties, import or registration fees, and other similar charges, including but not limited to use taxes, excise taxes, and VAT.

2. The goods, materiel, supplies, equipment, and other property referred to in Paragraph 1 of this Article shall be free from any tax or other charge that would otherwise be assessed upon such property after its importation or acquisition, and shall be free from Norwegian export duties upon exportation.

3. The Parties shall cooperate as necessary to ensure that the quantities of goods, materiel, supplies, equipment, and other property imported are reasonable. U.S. forces shall provide Norwegian authorities an appropriate certificate, as provided for in Article XI, Paragraph 4 of the NATO SOFA, that such goods, materiel, supplies, equipment, and other property qualify for the exemption under the terms of this Article. Deposit of the certificate shall be accepted in lieu of a customs inspection by Norwegian authorities of the items imported and exported by or for U.S. forces under this Article. When goods, materiel, supplies, equipment, and other property are imported by U.S. contractors or Norwegian contractors under the terms of this Article, U.S. forces shall require such contractors to use the items exclusively for the execution of U.S. forces’ contracts.
24

ARTICLE XIX
PERSONAL IMPORTATION AND EXPORTATION
1. Members of the U.S. forces, dependents, and U.S. contractors may import their personal effects, furniture, private motor vehicles and other goods intended for their personal or domestic use or consumption free of customs duty and taxes during their assignment in the territory of Norway. This privilege shall apply not only to goods that are the property of such persons but also to goods sent to them by way of gift or delivered to them in fulfillment of contracts concluded with persons not domiciled in the territory of Norway. This Paragraph shall be implemented in accordance with mutually determined procedures.

2. The goods referred to in Paragraph 1 of this Article and other goods acquired free of taxes and/or duties may be sold or otherwise transferred to persons in the territory of Norway. Payment of any taxes due as the result of transactions with persons not entitled to import such goods shall be the responsibility of the ultimate recipient of such goods. Members of the U.S. forces, dependents, and U.S. contractors may freely transfer property referred to in Paragraph 1 of this Article between themselves and such transfers shall be free of tax and/or duty. U.S. forces shall maintain records of these transfers of tax or duty free merchandise. Norwegian authorities shall accept duly filed police reports as conclusive proof that duty and tax free goods of members of the U.S. forces, dependents, and U.S. contractors have been stolen, which shall relieve the individuals of any liability for payment of the tax or duty.

3. Members of the U.S. forces, dependents, and U.S. contractors may re-export (or export) free of export duties or charges, any goods imported (or acquired) by them into the territory of Norway during their period of duty.
25

ARTICLE XX CUSTOMS PROCEDURES
1. Norway shall take all appropriate measures to ensure the smooth and rapid clearance of imports and exports contemplated under this Agreement. Any customs inspection shall take place expeditiously.

2. Customs inspections under this Agreement shall be carried out in accordance with procedures mutually agreed between Norwegian authorities and U.S. forces. Any customs inspection by Norwegian customs authorities of incoming or outgoing personal property of members of the U.S. forces or dependents shall be conducted when the property is delivered to or picked up from the individual’s residence or in accordance with mutually determined procedures.

3. Official U.S. Information may be imported into and exported from the territory of Norway without being subjected to a customs inspection. Official U.S. Information shall be appropriately marked and shall be certified as such by the appropriate U.S. forces authorities.

4. U.S. forces authorities shall establish the necessary measures at facilities where U.S. forces are located to prevent abuses of the rights granted under the customs provisions of the NATO SOFA and this Agreement. U.S. forces authorities and Norwegian authorities shall cooperate in the investigation of any alleged customs violations.
26

ARTICLE XXI MILITARY SERVICE ACTIVITIES
1. U.S. forces may establish military service exchanges, commissaries, other sales outlets, open messes, social and educational centers, and recreational service areas in the territory of Norway at mutually agreed locations for use by members of the U.S. forces, dependents, and other categories of authorized personnel as mutually agreed. U.S. forces authorities may operate and maintain the foregoing military service activities directly or through contract with other organizations.

2. U.S. forces may enter into contracts with financial institutions to operate banking and other financial activities in the territory of Norway for purposes under this Agreement for the exclusive use of U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and dependents, under the current DoD Overseas Military Banking Program or future similar framework, including, but not limited to, enabling cash withdrawals from and deposits to accounts, enabling bill payments, transfer of funds, and online services.

3. The activities and organizations referred to in this Article shall be accorded the same fiscal and customs exemptions granted to U.S. forces. With full respect for Norwegian laws and regulations, such activities and organizations shall be maintained and operated solely in accordance with applicable U.S. laws and regulations. Such activities and organizations shall not be required to collect or pay taxes or other fees for activities related to their operations.

4. U.S. forces shall adopt appropriate measures to prevent the sale of goods and property imported into or acquired in the territory of Norway by the activities and organizations referred to in Paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Article to persons who are not authorized to patronize such activities or organizations.
27

ARTICLE XXII MILITARY POST OFFICES
1. U.S. forces may establish, maintain, and operate military post offices for use by U.S. forces, dependents, U.S. contractors, and other categories of authorized personnel as mutually agreed.

2. Mail posted at such post offices may bear U.S. stamps.
3. Recognizing the customary rights of territorial sovereigns, U.S. forces’ official mail shall be exempt from inspection, search, or seizure.
4. U.S. forces authorities shall establish appropriate and necessary measures at military post offices to prevent the improper importation of goods into the territory of Norway by members of the U.S. forces, dependents, and U.S. contractors.
28

ARTICLE XXIII CURRENCY AND EXCHANGE
1. U.S. forces shall have the right to import, export, and use U.S. currency or financial instruments expressed in the currency of the United States in any amount.

2. U.S. forces authorities may distribute to or exchange for members of the U.S. forces and dependents currency of, and instruments denominated in, the currency valid in:
(a) the United States;
(b) Norway;
(c) the Euro zone; and
(d) any other country, to the extent required for the purpose of authorized travel, including
travel on leave.

3. Members of the U.S. forces and dependents may:
(a) Import and export U.S. currency and instruments denominated in currency of the United States; and
(b) Export from the territory of Norway any currency, and instruments denominated in any such currency, provided that such U.S. forces or dependents have either imported such currency or instruments into the territory of Norway, or received such currency or instruments from U.S. forces.

4. U.S. forces authorities shall, in consultation with Norwegian authorities, take appropriate measures in order to prevent any abuse of the rights granted under this Article and to safeguard the system of foreign exchange regulations of Norway insofar as they apply to personnel covered by this Agreement. It is the duty of members of the U.S. forces and dependents to respect the foreign exchange laws of each of the Parties.
29

ARTICLE XXIV LABOR
U.S. forces and organizations conducting those military service activities described in Articles XXI and XXII of this Agreement may recruit and employ dependents, as well as persons authorized to be employed in the territory of Norway. Such dependents shall not be required to possess a work permit for the employment referenced in this Article. The United States does not waive its sovereign immunity regarding the employment of such personnel under this Agreement, and procedures for their employment shall be described in an implementing arrangement.
30

ARTICLE XXV CONTRACTING PROCEDURES
1. U.S. forces may contract for any goods, materiel, supplies, equipment, and services (including construction) to be furnished or undertaken in the territory of Norway without restriction as to choice of contractor, supplier, or person who provides such goods, materiel, supplies, equipment, or services. U.S. forces shall strive to utilize Norwegian suppliers of goods, materiel, supplies, equipment, and services to the greatest extent practicable, in accordance with U.S. laws and regulations. Such contracts shall be solicited, awarded, and administered in accordance with U.S. laws and regulations. Offerors and contractors shall be clearly informed of the applicable laws and regulations in the solicitation and contract documents.

2. Norway shall accord to U.S. forces treatment in the matter of procurement of goods, services, and utilities no less favorable than is accorded to the Norwegian Armed Forces.
31

ARTICLE XXVI U.S. CONTRACTORS
1. Terms and conditions of employment for U.S. contractors shall be set by U.S. forces in accordance with applicable U.S. laws and regulations, and with respect for Norwegian law, to the degree not inconsistent with the military requirements of U.S. forces. U.S. contractors shall be exempt from Norwegian laws and regulations with regard to the licensing and registration of businesses and corporations solely with regard to the provision of goods and services to U.S. forces in the territory of Norway.

2. Employees of U.S. contractors shall be exempt from any requirement to possess a work permit in Norway for work exclusively under contract with or for U.S. forces. U.S. contractors shall be exempt from all corporate tax arising solely from the delivery to U.S. forces of goods or services, or from construction of facilities for U.S. forces. Such contractors shall not be subject to any form of income or profits tax by Norway or local authorities on that portion of its income or profits derived from a contract or subcontract with U.S. forces. U.S. contractors and employees of U.S. contractors shall be exempt from tax reporting obligations to the extent they are exempt from taxation in the territory of Norway.
32

ARTICLE XXVII ENVIRONMENT, PUBLIC HEALTH, AND SAFETY
1. The United States confirms that it shall respect relevant Norwegian environmental, public health, including sanitary and phytosanitary matters, and safety laws in the execution of U.S. policies. Norway confirms its policy to implement environmental, public health, and safety laws, regulations, and standards with due regard for the health and safety of U.S. forces, dependents, and U.S. contractors. The Parties agree to pursue a preventative rather than a reactive approach to environmental protection, public health, and safety. The competent authorities of the Parties intend to consult in matters relating to the environment, public health, and safety.

2. To assist in the environmentally sound management of hazardous wastes, Norway shall designate an entity as the competent authority for the purpose of its required notifications under the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal, adopted at Basel on March 22, 1989, and any implementing legislation. U.S. forces shall provide the information required for Norway to comply with such obligations.
33

ARTICLE XXVIII UTILITIES AND COMMUNICATIONS
1. U.S. forces, U.S. contractors, and Norwegian contractors shall be allowed to use water, electricity, and other public utilities in connection with activities under this Agreement on terms and conditions, including rates or charges, no less favorable than those available to the Norwegian Armed Forces or Norway in like circumstances, free from taxes or other government fees or charges. U.S. forces’ costs shall be equal to their pro rata share of the use of such utilities.

2. The Parties recognize that it may be necessary for U.S. forces to use the radio spectrum in connection with activities under this Agreement. The United States shall be allowed to operate its own telecommunication systems (as “telecommunication” is defined in the 1992 Constitution and Convention of the International Telecommunication Union). This shall include the right to utilize such means and services as required to ensure full ability to operate telecommunication systems, and the right to use, all necessary radio spectrum for this purpose. Use of the radio spectrum shall be free of cost to the United States. U.S. forces shall coordinate the use of frequencies with the Norwegian Executive Agent unless urgent operational requirements do not permit such coordination.
34

ARTICLE XXIX IMPLEMENTATION AND DISPUTES
1. All obligations under this Agreement shall be subject to the availability of appropriated funds authorized for these purposes.

2. As appropriate, the Parties or their Executive Agents may enter into implementing agreements or arrangements to carry out the provisions of this Agreement.

3. The Executive Agents shall consult as necessary to ensure the proper implementation of this Agreement. The Executive Agents shall develop procedures for consultation between their respective staffs on all matters concerning the effective implementation of this Agreement.

4. Disputes concerning the interpretation or application of this Agreement shall be resolved at the lowest level possible and, as necessary, elevated to the Executive Agents for consideration and resolution. Those disputes that cannot be resolved by the Executive Agents shall be referred to the Parties for consultation and resolution, as appropriate.

5. Disputes and other matters subject to consultation under this Agreement shall not be referred to any national court, or to any international court, tribunal, or similar body or to any other third party for settlement.
35

ARTICLE XXX
ENTRY INTO FORCE, AMENDMENT, AND DURATION
1. This Agreement shall enter into force on the date of the later note in an exchange of notes between the Parties indicating that each Party has completed its internal procedures necessary for entry into force of this Agreement.

2. This Agreement may be amended by written agreement of the Parties.

3. This Agreement shall have an initial term of ten (10) years. After the initial term, it shall continue in force, but may be terminated by either Party upon one (1) year’s written notice to the other Party through diplomatic channels.

4. Annex A to this Agreement shall form an integral part of this Agreement and may be amended by written agreement of the Parties or their Executive Agents.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned, being duly authorized by their respective Governments, have signed this Agreement.
DONE at Washington, United States of America, on the ______ day of ____________, 2021, and Oslo, Norway, on the ______ day of ____________, 2021, in duplicate, in the Norwegian and English languages, both texts being equally authentic.
FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE KINGDOM OF NORWAY:
FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:
36

ANNEX A
Agreed Facilities and Areas
• Rygge Military Air Station and Airfield
• Sola Military Air Station and Airfield
• Evenes Military Air Station and Airfield
• Ramsund Naval Station
37

—————————Next: US-Baltic Charter of Partnership——————————————

US-baltic Charter of Partnership

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary

January 16. 1998

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT
AT CHARTER SIGNING CEREMONY

East Room

2:45 P.M. EST

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. President Meri; President Brazauskas; President Ulmanis; members of the Estonian, Lithuanian, and Latvian delegations; Secretary Albright; Mr. Berger; members of Congress, Senator Dole, Mr. Brzezinski, and all friends of the Baltic nations who are here.

The Vice President and I and our administration were honored to welcome President Meri, President Brazauskas, and President Ulmanis to Washington to reaffirm our common vision of a Europe whole and free, where Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia play their full and rightful roles, and to sign a Charter of Partnership to build that Europe together.

To the three Presidents, let me say thank you. Thank you for the key role you have played in making this moment possible; holding to the difficult path of political and economic reform; leading Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania back to the community of free nations where they belong.

This Charter of Partnership underscores how far your nations have come. Almost exactly seven years ago today, Baltic citizens were facing down tanks in the struggle to reclaim their independence. Today your democracies have taken root. You stand among Europe’s fastest growing economies. Your nations are a source of stability within your region and beyond, through the Partnership for Peace, the Baltic Peacekeeping Battalion, and your contributions in Bosnia.

America has been proud to support this progress, through our seed assistance program, more than 500 Peace Corps volunteers, and in many other ways. We share a stake in your success. And with this charter we set out a framework to achieve our common goals. It affirms our commitment to promoting harmony and human dignity within our societies. It stresses our interest in close cooperation among the Baltic states and with all their neighbors. It launches new working groups on economic development to spur greater trade, investment, and growth, complementing the efforts of our European friends. And it furthers America’s commitment to help Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia to deepen their integration and prepare for membership in the European Union and NATO.

Of course, there can be no guarantees of admission to the Alliance. Only NATO’s leaders, operating by consensus, can offer membership to an aspiring state. But America’s security is tied to Europe, and Europe will never be fully secure if Baltic security is in doubt. NATO’s door is and will remain open to every partner nation, and America is determined to create the conditions under which Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia can one day walk through that door.

The hopes that fuel the goals of this charter must be matched by our will to achieve them. That’s why we’re forming a new partnership commission which Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott will chair. I’m pleased to report that the charter is making a difference already. Yesterday our nations signed treaties to eliminate double taxation, which will encourage American business to play an even greater role in Baltic prosperity. We’re also expanding our common efforts to combat organized crime with better information-sharing and more joint operations.

And this year the United States, in a unique public-private partnership with the Soros Open Society Institute, will be creating a Baltic-American Partnership Fund to promote the development of civic organizations. Nothing is more crucial to democracy’s success than a vibrant network of local groups committed to their communities and their nation. I want to thank George Soros for his visionary generosity.

I also want to say a special thanks to the Baltic American communities. For 50 years Lithuanian, Latvian, and Estonian Americans kept alive the dream of Baltic freedom. Now on the verge of a new century, they are working here at home and with their Baltic brothers and sisters to make sure the hard-won blessings of liberty will never be lost again.

President Meri, President Brazauskas, President Ulmanis, we recall the August day in 1989 when hundreds of thousands of people linked hands from Tallinn to Riga to Vilnius, forming a human chain as strong as the values for which it stood. Today that Baltic chain extends across the Atlantic Ocean. America’s hands and hearts and hopes are joined as one with yours. Working together we can build a new Europe of democracy, prosperity, and peace, where security is the province of every nation. And the future belongs to the free.
Thank you very much. (Applause.)

PRESIDENT ULMANIS: Dear President, ladies and gentlemen, today is a happy day as we are signing the U.S.A.-Baltic Charter. This charter will serve as a key for the next century. It makes us allies. Our signatures provide the strategic philosophy for the next century. They mark strong Atlantic — and also the formation of a new Europe. The Baltic region is a success story for all who shape it by their everyday work.

I call on President Clinton and his administration to get actively involved in the formation of its future. The symbolic meaning of the charter has been expressed in its first words, which speak about our common vision of the future. It has been created by people of our country in continuous work by mutual enrichment. I am proud of my people and its strengths. I am proud of my friends who I am happy to welcome here.
Thank you. (Applause.)

PRESIDENT BRAZAUSKAS: Dear President, ladies and gentlemen, today we are signing the particularly important document with the United States of America, with which we not only share common values, but are also linked by a number of American Lithuanians who have found home in the United States.

The Charter of Partnership establishes the institutional framework that promotes the furtherance of bilateral and multilateral cooperation, reciprocal support to the Euro-Atlantic integration and common efforts designed for the consolidation of security, prosperity, and stability within the region and Euro-Atlantic area as a whole.
The U.S.-Baltic Charter confirms repeatedly that Lithuania is a serious candidate for accession to NATO, as well as that the United States supports the Baltic states’ aspirations and their efforts to become members of the Alliance.

Lithuania values the Charter first and foremost as the commitment to its further role as the promoter of stability within our region and Europe as a whole; its commitment to progress, economic reforms, and further enhancement of defense system effectiveness and interoperability with the North Atlantic Alliance. We appreciate and our supportive of President Clinton’s and the U.S. role of leadership in opening up to Central European democracies the doors to history’s most successful alliance. It is our hope that this openness to new members will enhance the security and stability for all the present and aspiring members, as well as other European nations.
Thank you. (Applause.)

PRESIDENT MERI: Mr. President, Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, today is an historic day in the history of our four nations. With the signing of the Charter of Partnership among the United States of America and the Republic of Estonia, the Republic of Latvia, and the Republic of Lithuania, we enter a new phase of even closer United States-Baltic relations

Seventy-five years ago last summer, the United States and Estonia — entered diplomatic relations, thus launching a special relationship based in mutual respect and trust. There is an old saying that one recognizes a true friend in times of need. With its bipartisan support for non-recognition policy, America was a true friend of the Baltics in a time of need, acting as a beacon of hope throughout the long, dark and cold years of the Soviet occupation.

You, Mr. President, were a true friend when, four years ago, you personally contributed to making sure that occupation would end and the foreign troops would withdraw. This principled behavior is one quality of United States’ foreign policy that we greatly admire. The fact that morals play a major role in America’s foreign policy is what defines the United States as the world’s remaining superpower.

Estonia sees the United States-Baltic Charter as the latest expression of that principled approach. The Charter recognizes the Baltic States’ role in the American strategy to guarantee security and stability on the European Continent, and spells out that the United States has a real, profound, and enduring interest in the security and sovereignty of the Baltic States.

An important element in our security strategy is eventual full membership in NATO. We believe that NATO continues to be the sole guarantor of security and stability in Europe. Estonia applauds President Clinton for his leadership in starting the process of NATO enlargement which has already redefined the terms of security policy in Europe.

Estonia also understands that NATO enlargement through the Baltics will be the next big project of the Alliance. We believe that the question of Baltic membership in NATO will become the real test of post-Madrid security thinking — that is, that countries shall be able to choose their security arrangement regardless of geography.

We are confident that with American leadership, this test will be met with success. Thank you. (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT: I thank you all. We are now going to sign our charter. Before we do, I just want to say again how much I appreciate all of our guests coming here, all from the three nations, their American counterparts. And thank you Senator Durbin, Congresswoman Pelosi, Congressman Shimkus, Congressman Kucinich. Thank you, Senator Dole and Mr. Brzezinski.

And I’d also like to point out — I didn’t earlier — we have a very large, unusually large, representation from the Diplomatic Corps here, which is a tribute to the importance of this moment that the rest of the world community attaches to it. And I thank all the ambassadors who are here. Thank you all very much for your presence. (Applause.)

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————

———————-NEXT: US-Ukraine Charter on Strategic Partnership —————–

The following is the text of the U.S.-Ukraine Charter on Strategic Partnership signed by U.S. Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba in Washington, D.C. on November 10, 2021.

Begin Text:
Preamble

The United States and Ukraine:
Reaffirm the importance of our relationship as friends and strategic partners, based both on our shared values and common interests, including a commitment to a Europe that is whole, free, democratic, and at peace.

Reiterate that the strategic partnership existing between our two nations is critical for the security of Ukraine and Europe as a whole.
Underscore that our partnership is founded on common democratic values, respect for human rights and the rule of law, and a commitment to Ukraine’s implementation of the deep and comprehensive reforms necessary for full integration into European and Euro-Atlantic institutions in order to ensure economic prosperity for its people.

Commend Ukraine’s significant progress towards improving its democracy as well as its commitment to continuing democratic reform, which are crucial for advancing democracy throughout Eastern Europe.

Emphasize unwavering commitment to Ukraine’s sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity within its internationally recognized borders, including Crimea and extending to its territorial waters in the face of ongoing Russian aggression, which threatens regional peace and stability and undermines the global rules-based order.

Declare our determination to deepen our strategic partnership by expanding bilateral cooperation in political, security, defense, development, economic, energy, scientific, educational, cultural, and humanitarian spheres.
Affirm the commitments made to strengthen the Ukraine-U.S. strategic partnership by Presidents Zelenskyy and Biden on September 1, 2021.

Intend to use the Strategic Partnership Commission (SPC), its Working Groups and other bilateral mechanisms to maximize the potential of our cooperation and address the challenges outlined in this Charter.

Section I: Principles of Cooperation
This Charter is based on core principles and beliefs shared by both sides:

Support for each other’s sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and inviolability of borders constitutes the foundation of our bilateral relations.
Our friendship and strategic relationship stem from our fundamental mutual understanding and appreciation for the shared belief that democracy and rule of law are the chief guarantors of security, prosperity, and freedom.
Cooperation between democracies on defense and security is essential to respond effectively to threats to peace and stability.

A strong, independent, and democratic Ukraine, capable of defending its sovereignty and territorial integrity and promoting regional stability, contributes to the security and prosperity not only of the people of Ukraine, but of a Europe whole, free, democratic, and at peace.

Section II: Security and Countering Russian Aggression
The United States and Ukraine  share a vital national interest in a strong, independent, and democratic Ukraine. Bolstering Ukraine’s ability to defend itself against threats to its territorial integrity and deepening Ukraine’s integration into Euro-Atlantic institutions are concurrent priorities.

The United States recognizes Ukraine’s unique contribution to nuclear nonproliferation and disarmament and reaffirms its commitments under the “Memorandum on Security Assurances in Connection with Ukraine’s Accession to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons” (the Budapest Memorandum) of December 5, 1994.

Guided by the April 3, 2008 Bucharest Summit Declaration of the NATO North Atlantic Council and as reaffirmed in the June 14, 2021 Brussels Summit Communique of the NATO North Atlantic Council, the United States supports Ukraine’s right to decide its own future foreign policy course free from outside interference, including with respect to Ukraine’s aspirations to join NATO.

The United States and Ukraine intend to continue a range of substantive measures to prevent external direct and hybrid aggression against Ukraine and hold Russia accountable for such aggression and violations of international law, including the seizure and attempted annexation of Crimea and the Russia-led armed conflict in parts of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine, as well as its continuing malign behavior. The United States intends to support Ukraine’s efforts to counter armed aggression, economic and energy disruptions, and malicious cyber activity by Russia, including by maintaining sanctions against or related to Russia and applying other relevant measures until restoration of the territorial integrity of Ukraine within its internationally recognized borders.

The United States does not and will never recognize Russia’s attempted annexation of Crimea and reaffirms its full support for international efforts, including in the Normandy Format, aimed at negotiating a diplomatic resolution to the Russia-led armed conflict in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine on the basis of respect for international law, including the UN Charter.

The United States supports Ukraine’s efforts to use the Crimea Platform to coordinate international efforts to address the humanitarian and security costs of Russia’s occupation of Crimea, consistent with the Platform’s Joint Declaration.

The United States and Ukraine endorse the 2021 Strategic Defense Framework as the foundation of enhanced Ukraine-U.S. defense and security cooperation and intend to work to advance shared priorities, including implementing defense and defense industry reforms, deepening cooperation in areas such as Black Sea security, cyber defense, and intelligence sharing, and countering Russia’s aggression.

The United States and Ukraine are key partners in the broader Black Sea region and will seek to deepen cooperation with Black Sea Allies and partners to ensure freedom of navigation and effectively counter external threats and challenges in all domains.

The United States remains committed to assisting Ukraine with ongoing defense and security reforms and to continuing its robust training and exercises. The United States supports Ukraine’s efforts to maximize its status as a NATO Enhanced Opportunities Partner to promote interoperability.

Ukraine intends to continue to enhance democratic civilian control of the military, reform its security service, and modernize its defense acquisition processes to advance its Euro-Atlantic aspirations.

The United States and Ukraine underline the importance of close cooperation within international institutions, including the United Nations, the OSCE and the Council of Europe, and intend to multiply efforts in finding new approaches and developing joint actions in preventing individual states from trying to destroy the rule-based international order and forcefully to revise internationally recognized state borders.

The United States and Ukraine intend to support accountability for those responsible for abuses of human rights in the territories of Ukraine temporarily occupied by Russia, and to support the release of political prisoners and hostages held in these territories.  The United States intends to continue to support impartial criminal investigations conducted by war crimes units under the Office of the General Prosecutor.

The United States intends to continue assisting Ukraine in providing humanitarian support to people affected or displaced by the Russia-led armed conflict in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions as the government of Ukraine increases its provision of life-saving assistance in the form of food, shelter, safe drinking water, and protection for the most vulnerable, including the elderly.

The United States remains committed to enhancing Ukraine’s ability to secure and police its borders, and to pursuing greater information sharing and law enforcement cooperation to counter international criminal and terrorist activity, including the trafficking of people, weapons, and narcotics.

The United States and Ukraine pledge to combat the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and secure advanced technologies by adhering to international nonproliferation standards, strengthening, and effectively implementing export control regimes, and partnering to manage emerging technology risks.

The United States and Ukraine are committed to further developing their partnership in cyber security, countering hybrid threats, combating the spread of disinformation while upholding freedom of expression, and strengthening Ukraine’s cyber security infrastructure.

Section III: Democracy and Rule of Law
The United States and Ukraine are bound by the universal values that unite the free people of the world: respect for democracy, human rights, and the rule of law. Strengthening the rule of law, promoting reform of the legal system and of law enforcement structures, and combating corruption are crucial to the prosperity of Ukraine and its people.

The United States acknowledges the progress made by Ukraine in strengthening its democratic institutions and welcomes the important steps taken by Ukraine to develop an effective national justice and anti-corruption system.

The United States and Ukraine recognize the need for Ukraine to further pursue a comprehensive reform agenda to keep transforming the country and ensure a bright future for all people in Ukraine.

The United States intends to continue to support Ukraine’s commitment to strengthen efforts to combat corruption, including through independent media and journalism, and empower institutions that prevent, investigate, prosecute, and adjudicate corruption cases to bolster faith in rule of law, build a competitive economy, and to integrate Ukraine fully into European and Euro-Atlantic structures.

The United States recognizes Ukraine’s progress on reforms, including steps forward on defense and defense industry reforms, the establishment of independent anti-corruption institutions, land reform, local governance and decentralization, and digitalization. The United States intends to continue supporting further law enforcement and justice sector reforms in line with international best practices to strengthen public trust in the institutions responsible for upholding the rule of law in Ukraine.

The United States and Ukraine intend to continue to cooperate closely to promote remembrance, including increased public awareness of the Holodomor of 1932-1933 in Ukraine, and other brutalities committed within and against Ukraine in the past.

The United States and Ukraine confirm the importance of advancing respect for human rights, and fundamental freedoms in accordance with international commitments and obligations, as well as fighting racism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, and discrimination, including against Roma and members of the LGBTQI+ communities.

The United States and Ukraine share a desire to strengthen our people-to-people ties and enhance our cultural, educational, and professional exchanges that promote innovation, scientific research, entrepreneurship and increase mutual understanding between our people.

Section IV: Economic Transformation
The United States and Ukraine intend to expand cooperation to support economic reform, enhance job creation, foster economic growth, support efforts under United States-Ukraine Trade and Investment Council to expand market access for goods and services and to improve the investment environment, including through enhanced protection and enforcement of intellectual property.  Ukraine’s continued adoption and implementation of reforms are critical to ensuring that its economy delivers for all of its people. The United States supports the ambitious transformation plan for Ukraine’s economy aimed at reforming and modernizing key sectors and promoting investments.

The United States and Ukraine recognize the need to advance Ukraine’s energy security and to take urgent action to tackle climate change through sustainable, effective, and durable policy solutions underpinned by ongoing corporate governance reform.

The United States and Ukraine intend to strengthen economic and commercial ties, promote liberalization of trade conditions and facilitate access to markets for goods and services.  The United States intends to support Ukraine’s efforts to create a robust investment environment built on the principles of rule of law, a fair judiciary, transparency, respect for workers’ rights, innovations and digitalization, and strong protections for intellectual property.

Ukraine pledges to prioritize efforts to reform corporate governance in its state-owned enterprises and banks, which are intended to promote robust and inclusive economic growth in the Ukrainian economy and the bilateral U.S.-Ukrainian economic relationship. 
The United States intends to continue working with Ukraine in these efforts.  The United States intends to also expand its support to privatization initiatives, work with Ukraine to create an environment that attracts U.S. investment in these initiatives, support private sector development, and strengthen financial sector supervision.

The United States is committed to the energy security of Ukraine and intends to support Ukraine’s efforts to become energy independent, decarbonize its economy, deregulate its energy sector, diversify energy supplies, integrate with Europe’s energy grid, modernize its nuclear sector, manage a just transition from coal, and prevent the Kremlin’s use of energy as a geopolitical weapon. The Strategic Energy and Climate Dialogue is designed to accelerate these efforts.

The United States and Ukraine intend to work together to promote commercial partnership between Ukrainian and U.S. companies to significantly increase their participation in both economies, particularly, projects in energy, agriculture, infrastructure, transportation, safety and security, healthcare, and with a special focus on digitalization.

The United States and Ukraine intend to continue cooperation in the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes, and in implementing other mutually beneficial initiatives within bilateral science and technology cooperation.

The United States and Ukraine reaffirm the need to strengthen Ukraine’s healthcare infrastructure and its capacity to react to and manage pandemics, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The United States intends to continue to explore pathways for providing Ukraine with assistance to advance these objectives.

This Charter replaces the U.S.-Ukraine Charter on Strategic Partnership, signed at Washington on December 19, 2008. The United States and Ukraine intend to revise this Charter every ten years or earlier if both sides believe that changes are needed.
 
 
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Ukraine
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